Tiny Beasts | Fiction

Ayla Zuraw-Friedland

Global warming was fucking up the squirrels. It was of course fucking everything up — the new and improved Boston Seaport would be underwater in twenty years, and the mosquitos were leaving particularly nasty welts. But special attention was on the squirrels. Higher-than-usual temperatures were fermenting the berries they ate off the trees and getting them so drunk they lost their sense of balance. They dented the roofs of cars...

Three Poems | Poetry

Natalie Shapero

Play In Often I have been told I should be in movies, not because I am glamorous or anything like that, but because my expressions are at times borderline imperceptible; seeing me from a regular distance, people can’t tell how I feel. So really what they’re recommending is enlargement, the ability to be transmitted to others by close-up. Isn’t there a way to get this accomplished without becoming an actor?...

But What I Really Want to Do Is Write! | The Year of the Auteur Novel

Hanson O’Haver

“We tell ourselves stories in order to live,” Joan Didion wrote. She also wrote, with her husband, more than twenty screenplays in order to make money. The couple was hardly alone: from the early days of Hollywood, literary figures like Graham Greene, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, and Brecht took a swing at the pictures. More recent efforts have come from Don DeLillo, Cormac McCarthy, Margaret Atwood, Paul Auster, and...

A Dispatch from China

Charlene Wang

From mid-June through the end of August, China experienced its worst heat wave in more than 60 years. Hardly anyone was invulnerable: even while working indoors, several of my friends, all in their twenties, experienced heat stroke. On social media, other effects were on display, from eggs boiling on car dashboards and shrimp cooking in the outdoor heat to wildfires in Chongqing and severe drought across southern cities. In August,...

A Dispatch from France

Annie Crabill

When school children in Lyon, France, returned to classes this fall, they had a critical decision to make: are they a vegetarian Jeune Pousse, or an omnivorous Petit Bouchon?  According to a sample menu, the former, which translates to “Young Sprout,” will enjoy a tandoori-spiced stew with chickpeas, lentils, and vegetables. The latter, named with a nod to traditional Lyonnais restaurants, will be served veal in a tomato-mushroom sauce. Radishes...

A Dispatch from Kenya

April Zhu

In his inauguration speech on September 13, President William Samoei Ruto reaffirmed Kenya’s pledge to transition fully to renewable energy by 2030. The country isn’t far from that goal. Unlike the United States, where only about a fifth of domestic electricity currently comes from solar, geothermal, or wind power, Kenya is already at 92 percent. It hosts the largest solar project in East and Central Africa, as well as the...

A Dispatch from the American West

Emma Hager

Back in the stiff heat of August, I sat with family and friends, on the porch of an old lodge in southwestern New Mexico, where we broached our habitual subjects of fire and water in the American West. Since the rains had arrived mid-June, we ceded our reunion plans to the Gila River — whose channels, by then, were too deep for even jacked-up trucks to cross — but decided...

A Dispatch from the United Kingdom

Hannah Hunt

On July 4, around 2 p.m., I stood staring at Velázquez’s “The Rokeby Venus” in the National Gallery in London. It’s barely noticeable, but if you look closely, you can see that tiny stitches bind five cuts slashed into the painting’s canvas — an act of civil disobedience performed by the Canadian suffragette Mary Richardson 108 years ago as part of the campaign that won women the right to vote....

A Dispatch from Turkey

Erin O’Brien

Yakup Şekip Okumuşoğlu has dedicated his life to a cause bound to fail. He is the primary counsel for the protest movement fighting to protect the İskencedere valley in the northern Turkish province of Rize. Every day since March 2021, he and dozens of fellow İkizdere activists have thrown everything they can — lawsuits, vocal pleas, and even their bodies — in front of the heavy machinery brought in by...

A Dispatch from Patagonia

Chanelle Adams

Earth is now “the largest shareholder” of outdoor clothing retailer Patagonia, per the company’s homepage. Fall gear is 50 percent off in advance of the change, which will of course outlast the season. Rather than going public like competitor North Face, Patagonia rebranded as “going purpose.” In an unprecedented stroke of generosity, or otherwise a creative retirement plan, the billionaire Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard donated the entire company to the...

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